Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Windows DNS Server Interview Questions –Part3



Windows DNS Server Interview Questions –Part3

21.You installed a new AD domain and the new (and first) DC has not registered its SRV records in DNS. Name a few possible causes.
The machine cannot be configured with DNS client her own .
The DNS service cannot be run.

22.What are the benefits and scenarios of using Stub zones?
Understanding stub zones
A stub zone is a copy of a zone that contains only those resource records necessary to identify the authoritative Domain Name System (DNS) servers for that zone.
A stub zone is used to resolve names between separate DNS namespaces. This type of resolution may be necessary when a corporate merger requires that the DNS servers for two separate DNS namespaces resolve names for clients in both namespaces.
A stub zone consists of:
? The start of authority (SOA) resource record, name server (NS) resource records, and the glue A resource records for the delegated zone. The IP address of one or more master servers that can be used to update the stub zone. The master servers for a stub zone are one or more DNS servers authoritative for the child zone, usually the DNS server hosting the primary zone for the delegated domain name.
Use stub zones to:
? Keep delegated zone information current.
By updating a stub zone for one of its child zones regularly, the DNS server hosting both the parent zone and the stub zone will maintain a current list of authoritative DNS servers for the child zone.
? Improve name resolution.
Stub zones enable a DNS server to perform recursion using the stub zone's list of name servers without needing to query the Internet or internal root server for the DNS namespace.
? Simplify DNS administration.
By using stub zones throughout your DNS infrastructure, you can distribute a list of the authoritative DNS servers for a zone without using secondary zones. However, stub zones do not serve the same purpose as secondary zones and are not an alternative when considering redundancy and load sharing.
There are two lists of DNS servers involved in the loading and maintenance of a stub zone:
? The list of master servers from which the DNS server loads and updates a stub zone. A master server may be a primary or secondary DNS server for the zone. In both cases, it will have a complete list of the DNS servers for the zone.
? The list of the authoritative DNS servers for a zone. This list is contained in the stub zone using name server (NS) resource records. When a DNS server loads a stub zone, such as widgets.example.com, it queries the master servers, which can be in different locations, for the necessary resource records of the authoritative servers for the zone widgets.example.com. The list of master servers may contain a single server or multiple servers and can be changed anytime.
23.what are the benefits and scenarios of using Conditional Forwarding?
Rather than having a DNS server forward all queries it cannot resolve to forwarders, the DNS server can forward queries for different domain names to different DNS servers according to the specific domain names that are contained in the queries. Forwarding according to these domain-name conditions improves conventional forwarding by adding a second condition to the forwarding process.
A conditional forwarder setting consists of a domain name and the IP address of one or more DNS servers. To configure a DNS server for conditional forwarding, a list of domain names is set up on the Windows Server 2003-based DNS server along with the DNS server IP address. When a DNS client or server performs a query operation against a Windows Server 2003- based DNS server that is configured for forwarding, the DNS server looks to see if the query can be resolved by using its own zone data or the zone data that is stored in its cache, and then, if the DNS server is configured to forward for the domain name that is designated in the query (a match), the query is forwarded to the IP address of a DNS Server that is associated with the domain name. If the DNS server has no domain name listed for the name that is designated in the query, it attempts to resolve the query by using standard recursion.

24.What is the 224.0.1.24 address used for?
WINS server group address. Used to support auto discovery and dynamic configuration of replication for WINS servers. For more information, see WINS replication overview WINS server group address. Used to support auto discovery and dynamic configuration of replication for WINS servers.
25.Describe the importance of DNS to AD ?
When Microsoft began development on Active Directory, full compatibility with the domain name system (DNS) was a critical priority. Active Directory was built from the ground up not just to be fully compatible with DNS but to be so integrated with it that one cannot exist without the other. Microsoft's direction in this case did not just happen by chance, but because of the central role that DNS plays in Internet name resolution and Microsoft's desire to make its product lines embrace the Internet.
While fully conforming to the standards established for DNS, Active Directory can expand upon the standard feature set of DNS and offer some new capabilities such as AD-Integrated DNS, which greatly eases the administration required for DNS environments. In addition, Active Directory can easily adapt to exist in a foreign DNS environment, such as Unix BIND, as long as the BIND version is 8.2.x or higher. When Microsoft began development on Active Directory, full compatibility with the domain name system (DNS) was a critical priority.
Active Directory was built from the ground up not just to be fully compatible with DNS but to be so integrated with it that one cannot exist without the other. Microsoft's direction in this case did not just happen by chance, but because of the central role that DNS plays in Internet name resolution and Microsoft's desire to make its product lines embrace the Internet.
While fully conforming to the standards established for DNS, Active Directory can expand upon the standard feature set of DNS and offer some new capabilities such as AD-Integrated DNS, which greatly eases the administration required for DNS environments. In addition, Active Directory can easily adapt to exist in a foreign DNS environment, such as Unix BIND, as long as the BIND version is 8.2.x or higher.

0 Responses to “Windows DNS Server Interview Questions –Part3”